Free documentary: Reykjavik Rising – Iceland’s untold uprising

This documentary is now available to download or watch online

September 11, 2015 · 2 min read

533057645_640In October 2008 Iceland was hit with one of the biggest financial disasters any nation in the world had experienced. In response, citizens took to the streets creating what is now known as the ‘Pots and Pans Revolution’.

In response to widespread media silence and a growing global trend towards people-led movements, this documentary explores how and why the people of Iceland resisted the measures imposed by their government following the crisis of 2008 and how they forced their government to resign in an attempt to forge a new political path.

Filmed in Reykjavik between 2012 and 2014, the documentary meets the instigators of the revolution and follows the most important national referendum in Iceland’s history; giving the Icelandic people the opportunity to decide whether to support a constitution that had been created through a popular grassroots movement.

In light of a growing international trend towards grassroots movements crossing over into mainstream politics, this documentary is a timely portrayal of one such movement and their struggle to change the face of democracy.

The documentary was produced by the Conscious Collective and premiered at the Tolpuddle Radical Film Festival


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