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July 15, 2013 · 2 min read

book coverThere is a buzz around the latest edition of Beyond the Fragments that has sparked discussion events around the UK. On feminism and the making of socialism, the three authors Sheila Rowbotham, Lynne Segal and Hilary Wainwright write:

‘A generation ago we wrote Beyond the Fragments. Inspired by the activism of the 1970s, and facing the imminent triumph of the right under Margaret Thatcher, we sought to apply our experiences as feminists to creating stronger bonds of solidarity in a new kind of movement.

Since then the obstacles facing us have grown formidably; deepening recession, environmental pollution, falling real wages and savage welfare cuts.

New forms of resistance have appeared, but how are they to coalesce? In our three new essays to this new edition we return to the fraught question of how to consolidate diverse upsurges of rebellion into effective, open democratic left coalitions.’

Read more:

Beyond the Fragments is more than a history, writes Alice Robson
Back to the Fragments, Lynne Segal reflects on its lessons for today

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