East and Southeast Asia


The global spectres of ‘Asian horror’

18 October 2021 Bliss Cua Lim looks at how the female ghost subgenre illuminates efforts to globalise ‘Asian horror’

One-party rule in Singapore?

28 September 2021 The People's Action Party has won every election since 1959 - but it hasn't always been a fair fight, writes Kirsten Han

The blood never dries

19 August 2021 While our government wants us to step back and forget what we know about the violence of Britain’s imperial state, Richard Gott says it’s time for a much deeper reckoning

Is the UK prepared for a Super China and its global New Silk Road?

17 April 2019 China's industrial strategy poses new challenges for the UK, writes Dorothy Guerrero

‘History is repeating itself’: A Duterte resistor speaks

4 February 2019 Tom Sykes speaks to Gene Alcantara about Duterte's dictatorship, and what it means for Filipino citizens in the diaspora.

‘We have to start from scratch’: life after fleeing North Korea

20 February 2016 Narjas Theodora Zatat spoke to activist Hyeonseo Lee, who is a refugee from North Korea

UK must end all arms sales to Hong Kong

2 October 2014 Following the attempted suppression of protests in Hong Kong, writer and researcher Nicholas Gilby and Andrew Smith of Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT) consider the UK's involvement in the violence and call for an end all arms sales to Hong Kong.

Japanese workers fight against karoshi, death from overwork

16 September 2014 Scott North looks at the history of the anti-karoshi movement and its latest victory

Interview: Occupy Central founder Benny Tai Yiu-ting

11 September 2014 Luke Cooper spoke to Benny Tai Yiu-ting, one of the founders of Occupy Central in Hong Kong, about the growth of the movement and the prospects for real democracy free from the influence of Beijing

North Korea: War games gone wrong

18 June 2013 Tim Beal examines the US ‘playbook’ miscalculations that underlie the current US-North Korea crisis

Manufacturing dissent in China

4 December 2012 Geoff Crothall reports on the remarkable success of workers’ movements in China

Biting the rotten Apple: Taking on Foxconn

23 August 2012 Jenny Chan talks about her campaigning with workers in China

Make or break for Japan’s left

22 June 2010 Japan's Prime Minister, Yukio Hatoyama has resigned after his failure to honour an election promise to move a US military base from Okinawa, Glyn Ford reports

Beating Burma’s blackout

11 December 2009 The film Burma VJ brings Burma's struggle for freedom into close proximity to its audience and is generating new solidarity efforts as a result. Siobhan McGuirk investigates

China’s animal revolution rises

1 September 2009 Grassroot support and pressure for new animal protection is growing, says Dave Neale, animal welfare director of Animals Asia Foundation

23 June

23 June 2009 Vietnamese photographer Nick Ut's Pullitzer prize-winning photograph of nine-year-old Kim Phuc fleeing a US napalm attack on her village appeared in Life magazine on this day in 1972. The picture had previously been rejected by some news agencies because it showed a naked girl.

The Tet Offensive 40 years on

12 February 2008 The end of January 2008 marked the 40th anniversary of an event that astonished the world, changed the course of history, and remains pregnant with lessons for today. In the early hours of 31 January 1968, soldiers of the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam and the Army of North Vietnam launched what came to be known as the Tet Offensive (it coincided with Tet Nguyen Dan, the lunar new year) against the US occupiers and their puppet government, writes Mike Marqusee

Papuan justice denied

1 November 2007 Indonesian human rights campaigner Peneas Lokbere talks to Kirk Ward about transmigration policy, Papuan rights and Indonesian state torture

A global war on labour?

16 October 2007 The number of trade unionists killed, arrested or 'just' dismissed in the pursuit of their members rights has increased alarmingly over the past year, according to a survey by the International Trade Union Confederation. Italian labour journalist Vittorio Longhi, interviews ITUC general secretary Guy Ryder about these and other issues facing the international trade union movement

China’s pollution solution

3 October 2007 With China now leading the list of global polluters, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) play an increasingly important role in tackling the country's environmental challenges. Lucia Green-Weiskel reports from Beijing on the dilemmas facing civil society groups in working with China's authoritarian state

Local fighters lead climate war

1 August 2007 As the EU, the US and big business vie with each other to be recognised as taking serious action on climate change, Larry Lohmann wonders whether the real leadership is to be found elsewhere

Nukes for all

1 November 2006 Is the world on the brink of a new nuclear arms race, with North Korea's atomic bomb test marking the end of non-proliferation? John Gittings reports

A new Siamese tragedy

1 November 2006 Thailand's recent military coup - the 18th since 1932 - ousted a leader, Thaksin Shinawatra, who had already lost moral legitimacy and much of his political power. In pre-empting the democracy of the street, argues Walden Bello, the country's military has administered a cure that will prove worse than the disease

A killing a day keeps democracy away

1 October 2006 Left activists in the Philippines are being killed at an alarming rate. Oscar Reyes spoke to Millet Morante, a leading figure in Kilusan para sa Pambansang Demokrasya (KPD, Movement for National Democracy) and Laban Ng Masa (Struggle of the Masses), a coalition of progressive organisations and political parties

Telling the truth about Tibet

1 December 2005 Construction cranes, it has been said, are the new national bird of China – and Tibet certainly has its share. Economic development also conceals what is happening under the surface.

From Mao to the market

1 December 2005 There is more continuity between Maoist and modern-day China than is often recognised, writes John Gittings. It’s the importance of the Chinese people that has been lost along the way

The struggle continues: fighting back after Tiananmen

1 December 2005 Sixteen years ago, the Tiananmen Square massacre in 1989 left the blood of the Chinese democracy movement on the streets of Beijing. Now China’s new economy is claiming more lives. But the workers are fighting back.

No carbon copy of the west?

1 December 2005 With China’s energy consumption increasing by 65 per cent over the past three years alone, its rapid industrialisation has already made it the world’s second largest emitter of the greenhouse gases that accelerate climate change. Mel Jarman looks at how it is approaching the issue

Revving up the China Threat

1 November 2005 Michael Klare looks at how the Bush Administration's stance on China has gone from worry about its economic strength to full-on preparation for a new cold war

Don’t build dams everywhere!

1 May 2005 With the effects of dam construction going well beyond the dislocation of people, China is waking up to its hydro legacy.

Modern heroes, modern slaves

1 April 2004 Doctors and nurses from the Philippines pay thousands of pounds so they can travel to the UK and work for as little as £8 a day in British hospitals and nursing homes.

Jakarta imposes martial law in Aceh

1 June 2003 On 19 May 2003 the Indonesian government placed Aceh, one of Indonesia's most resource-rich provinces, under martial law. This followed the breakdown of a December 2002 peace agreement between the government and the Free Aceh Movement (Gam). Breaking the original agreement, the government demanded that Gam gave up its goal of independence and laid down its arms. When Gam refused, Indonesian president Megawati Sukarnoputri declared martial law



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