Demonstration to save the University of London Union

Students and workers to mobilise on Wednesday 13th November to fight the closure of ULU

November 11, 2013 · 2 min read

ULU

In May, the University of London (UOL) announced its decision to shut down the University of London Union (ULU) from August 2014, and replace it with a management run services centre. In response, students at UOL have launched a campaign to reverse the decision, which was taken without student consent. The ‘Save Your Union‘ campaign is not only fighting to prevent the closure of ULU but is also demanding better working conditions for all campus workers and greater student oversight into the running the university itself.

The initial organising meeting for the campaign took place at the beginning of October and representatives from numerous campuses, clubs and societies were in attendance and spent the evening in working groups developing a coordinated campaign strategy for the next six months. The first major date of the campaign will be a national mobilisation on campus (Malet Street, London WC1E 7HY), scheduled for this Wednesday (13 November) at 13.00pm. Additionally, a student referendum is expected to be carried out in the near future and a number of complimentary actions—including club-nights and promotional videos—are already being planned.

The loss of ULU—the only democratically ran representative body for students within UOL and a genuine focal point for student life in London—would be catastrophic.

For more information contact:

daniel.cooper@ulu.lon.ac.uk

michael.chessum@ulu.lon.ac.uk

womens@ulu.lon.ac.uk


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