Arts & Culture


Pixels and mortar: The politics of video game worldbuilding

20 April 2022 With the worlds of architecture and video games becoming increasingly intertwined, Gerry Hart examines how video games communicate through their design

Revolutionary threads in feminist art

18 March 2022 Siobhán McGuirk reports on textile arts used by feminist activists worldwide, from 1800 Paris factory workers to anti-capitalist 'yarnbombers' today

Solidarity, sit-ins, and samosa packets: one artist activist’s journey

10 March 2022 Sofia Karim recalls how her uncle's arrest led her to create an online platform for artist activists to campaign against authoritarianism

Collage including photos of Seferis and Theodorakis

A poet, a composer and an unlikely Greek protest song

6 March 2022 Mikis Theodorakis died in September last year, half a century after one of his most illustrious collaborators, the Nobel Prize-winning poet Giorgos Seferis. Eugenia Russell looks at the unlikely protest song that unites them

A choir in colourful outfits with arms outstretched

Revitalising artistic activism in the age of art-wash

23 February 2022 We must be looking to artistic interventions that are inclusive, transformative and embody true solidarity, writes Chris Garrard

A brush with revolution: art and organising

27 January 2022 Artist Sarbjit Johal reflects on the role of visual art in protest, movement-building and giving a voice to marginalised people

The lasting legacy of Raymond Williams

30 December 2021 Rhian E. Jones reflects on the legacy of Raymond Williams, born 100 years ago, and his enduring influence on Red Pepper

The rule of the flesh eaters

31 October 2021 Capitalism entails endless, repeated horror, writes Mark Steven. Can cinematic horror help us to understand – and overthrow – it?

Learning from the Sphinx

29 October 2021 Terry Eagleton draws a modern lesson from ancient monsters

Morality tales

25 October 2021 From cowardly men to wayward wives, pre-modern superstitions transmitted social norms as well as scares, writes Eleanor Janega

Playing on the dark side: An interview with Dawn Ray’d

22 October 2021 Gerry Hart speaks to Simon Barr of Dawn Ray'd about black metal, its relationship with the far right and its radical potential

The global spectres of ‘Asian horror’

18 October 2021 Bliss Cua Lim looks at how the female ghost subgenre illuminates efforts to globalise ‘Asian horror’

Rudolf Rocker: an anarchist ‘rabbi’ in London

12 October 2021 David J. Lobina rediscovers a forgotten but fascinating figure in London’s radical and Jewish history

#TWT21: Red Pepper at The World Transformed

23 September 2021 The World Transformed festival gets underway this weekend - here's where and when you can catch some of Red Pepper's editors and friends.

A section of the exhibition showing an arrangement of monochrome portraits

Review – War Inna Babylon at the ICA

10 September 2021 Tara Okeke explores a timely exhibition which offers a compelling history of Black life in Britain through the lens of people, place and struggle

Review – You’re History: The Twelve Strangest Women in Music

18 July 2021 Lesley Chow argues for a new kind of music criticism that re-evaluates women musicians and "meaningless" music, writes Rhian E Jones

Prevent strategy funding Birmingham theatre

30 June 2021 The government’s Prevent strategy is funding productions that will damage community relations, argues Keith McKenna

"Books of Knowledge Picton Library Liverpool" by Terry Kearney is marked with CC0 1.0

The working-class voices publishing against the grain

28 June 2021 Luke Charnley reports on the new publishing houses getting working-class writers onto the printed page.

Review – Angela Carter’s ‘Provincial Bohemia’

13 May 2021 Despite some omissions, Stephen E Hunt's examination of radical novelist Angela Carter's time in Bristol and Bath provides a useful lens to analyse the countercultural history of the two cities, argues Sue Tate.

Screenshot from Cyberpunk 2077 showing a character from the game sitting in front of a futuristic cityscape and the word 'broken' graffitied onto a wall

Video games and anti-capitalist aesthetics

7 May 2021 As more and more video games infuse their narratives with explicitly political themes, B.G.M. Muggeridge asks why so many fall short in actually challenging capitalism

Terrible films about the Troubles

6 April 2021 Taking a cinematic tour of predictable plots and improbable accents, Stephen Hackett finds himself asking: hasn’t Ulster suffered enough?

Virtual exhibitions and art for all

4 April 2021 A year into our new virtual reality, Siobhan McGuirk suggests a silver lining: once-exclusive degree shows are more accessible than ever

Review – Tracksuits, Traumas and Class Traitors

21 February 2021 D Hunter's 'Tracksuits, Traumas and Class Traitors' is an exploration of working-class struggle and strength, writes Liam Kennedy

Bank Job directors Daniel and Hilary

Review – Bank Job

20 February 2021 Jake Woodier reviews a new documentary film that brings heist aesthetics to a story of debt activism

Review – National Theatre Connections 2020: Plays for young people

30 December 2020 From climate change to the perils of the information era, the collection powerfully explores the struggles facing contemporary teenagers, writes Jordana Belaiche

Love Island stars advertising various products

That’s advertainment: reality TV and product placement

17 December 2020 Sophie Benson explores the insidious role of unethical advertising in reality TV – and in the offscreen careers of its stars

Review – I Want to Believe: Posadism, UFOs and apocalypse communism by A M Gittlitz

22 November 2020 Despite its outlandish reputation, A M Gittlitz's analysis of Posadism shows there is value in occasionally indulging in fanciful thinking, writes Dawn Foster.

Will the beat go on?

1 November 2020 Gerry Hart reports on lockdown, gentrification and the face of Newcastle's live music

The importance of queer space

30 October 2020 From creating to ‘taking up’ space, Molly Fleming reports on the ongoing efforts to sustain radical queer traditions

Whose streets?

28 October 2020 Public spaces became increasingly valued during lockdown – and increasingly policed. We must continue to reclaim and celebrate it for everyone, says Morag Rose

Pints, patriotism and precarity

14 October 2020 Oli Carter-Esdale explores the weaponisation of the pint and asks: where next for the hospitality sector?

Power plays: the rise of game worker unions

6 October 2020 Amid global economic crisis, business is booming in the gaming industry. It's time to step up the fight for worker's rights, Emma Kinema tells Marzena Zukowska

The World Transformed: democratising the culture sector post lockdown

4 September 2020 Julie Saumagne and Sam Swann explore the links between worker exploitation and institutional elitism in the culture industry

Ntando Yam: theatre as protest

28 August 2020 Phoebe Kisubi reflects on using participatory theatre as a tool for social and political activism among sex workers in Cape Town, South Africa

Talking back to Shakespeare: theatre in women’s prisons

26 August 2020 Shakespeare’s women can alert us to alternative stories – if we listen to them. In ‘talking back’ to the Bard we can change our own stories, says Charlotte Scott

Edinburgh street artists perform in Edinburgh on the last weekend of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2009. This year saw a record number of acts perform representing the best dance, theatre and comedy.

Who’s laughing now?

22 August 2020 As venues tentatively reopen post-lockdown, Siobhán McGuirk surveys the impact of the pandemic on comedy, theatre and the cultural sector

A little more action: theatre, disability, and Elvis

20 August 2020 Elizabeth McGuirk interviews Claire Cunningham, the internationally acclaimed disabled artist, about taking risks, engaging audiences beyond our own bubble, and the enduring power of The King

Shake it up: class, theatre and politics

16 August 2020 Political theatre should ask questions – and prompt us to challenge the status quo. Evie Manning explains the Common Wealth approach

Immigrants stand up

15 August 2020 With casual xenophobia a comedy circuit blight, No Direction Home is a welcome tonic. Here, five troupe members explain the uses and power of laughter – and tell us some jokes

The rise of comedian politicians

6 August 2020 As more and more comedians find success in the political arena, Rhian Jones lists some of the most prominent examples of satirists turned statesmen

Bedding down in the shadows of Belfast’s bonfires

4 August 2020 The bonfires of Belfast have a raw relevance. Pádraig Ó Meiscill reflects on an annual controversy.

Woke jokes

1 August 2020 There’s nothing radical – or funny – about right-wing comedy, says Jake Laverde

Boris Johnson on Have I Got News for You (BBC via The Guardian)

How Corbyn unmasked comedy

31 July 2020 Juliet Jacques argues that the way comedians treated Jeremy Corbyn demolished their anti-establishment credentials

Review – Steal as Much as You Can by Nathalie Olah

4 July 2020 Anna Clayton reviews Natalie Olah's book, which explores how upper middle-class pop culture has affected British politics

Lockdown live: ‘Race today’

24 June 2020 Join Red Pepper editor K Biswas and guests Paul Gilroy, Lola Olufemi, Ciaran Thapar and Joy White to discuss marginality, inequality, creativity and belonging in Britain

How to make comedy in the time of Corona

16 June 2020 Comedian Elf Lyons discusses creative innovation and rebellion in a dystopian age

Gender, class and cliché in Normal People

26 May 2020 The BBC hit drama shows the complexities of class mobility, but can’t avoid class and gender stereotypes, says Frances Hatherley

Review – Mask Off: Masculinity Redefined by J J Bola

14 May 2020 Mask Off offers a toolbox of explanations and arguments to question and challenge toxic masculinity, writes Huw Lemmey

Hidden labours: how capitalism shapes gaming culture

29 April 2020 Paolo Ruffino looks beyond the myths of the video game industry to its contemporary neoliberal realities

Lockdown live: ‘Can video games change the world?’

28 April 2020 Globally, 2.5 billion people play video games. Is the left in danger of overlooking their immense power and influence? Join the debate live on April 30, 6pm



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