Climate


Light up my life

1 February 2005 Dear Subcomandauntie, Having campaigned against the war for Iraq's oil, I am increasingly concerned about oil's effect on climate change. I really want to put my own house in order by cutting back my use of oil, starting with changing my electricity supplier to a 'green' one. But I don't really see the point as all suppliers are legally obliged to have a quota of renewable energy, anyway. Will switching merely take the heat off my conscience? Olive Oil

Half-baked and irrelevant

1 December 2004 The EU's much heralded Emissions Trading Scheme will do nothing to tackle the problem of climate change.

The people vs the corporate polluters

1 September 2004 Campaigners in the US are pioneering the use of civil lawsuits to force business to act on climate change, writes Melanie Jarman

No day after tomorrow

1 July 2004 There are plenty of things to say about The Day After Tomorrow, the recent $125m eco-catastrophe film. It's overlong, implausible, deeply derivative (a Poseidon Adventure on Ice), moderately well acted, thrilling in parts, and a film that will appeal to the kind of boy who likes to build elaborate models and then stamp on them.

Cruising for a bruising

1 June 2004 The prime minister seems to have woken up to the reality of climate change. So why is his government so recklessly keen on encouraging the aviation industry?

Interview with Mark Lynas, author of High Tide

1 April 2004 Mark Lynas spent three years travelling round the globe in search of one of the greatest untold tales of our time. Convinced that climate change was no longer a concern just for the future, Lynas set off to find that global warming is already having a tangible effect on people's lives. His wry observations and suggestions for change are brought together in High Tide: News from a Warming World, published this March. Melanie Jarman found out what he had to say for himself.

Why Planting Trees for Carbon Guilt Doesn’t Add Up

1 March 2004 What do the production and distribution of Dido's Life for Rent album; Formula 1 racing; and more environmentally conscious air passengers have in common? All have had trees planted or preserved to compensate for, or "offset", their carbon-emitting behaviour. Unfortunately, however attractive such an equation between problem (climate change-accelerating carbon dioxide emissions) and solution (plant trees) might be, it doesn't actually work.

What planet are we on?

1 February 2004 Imagine a planet which once held great oceans. Which had the warmth and water needed to support life. Now a freezing wind howls across rock strewn deserts whipping its red earth around high peaks and deep into valleys. With January's latest expeditions to Mars this, the Red Planet, is once again under scrutiny. For the first time, the robotic envoys of the human race will be searching for a history of water, a prerequisite for life on Mars. And although the planet's atmosphere is currently too heavy with carbon dioxide to sustain human life and the plants that would meet many needs, the question again rears its head - what would it take for human beings to live on Mars?

New Labour think-tank says Kyoto is flawed

1 August 2003 A major London think-tank with close ties to New Labour has highlighted the limitations of the Kyoto Protocol on climate change and thrown its weight behind a radical green policy based on equal rights to the atmosphere for the world's population.

Mexico City to pilot radical Climate Action Programme

1 December 2002 The capital of Mexico, whose air is one of the smoggiest in the world, is set to become the first city with its own climate action programme. The ambitious 2002-2010 Valley of Mexico Metropolitan Area Air Quality Improvement Programme, nicknamed Poraire III, will set a global precedent if it succeeds in its aim to reduce health expenditures through air quality management.



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