Carry on occupying! – your help is needed

Tom Robinson celebrates the ongoing defiance of Occupy London and calls for your practical help

January 9, 2012 · 2 min read

Occupy London remains defiant.   It flatly opposes the  risky, dangerous, fraudulent and unaccountable behaviour of those with unchecked power sitting in the offices of the financial district.  It rejects utterly the neoliberal ‘solution’ to capitalism’s problems. There is no alternative to cuts and privatisations we are told. This movement says otherwise.

Since  15th October 2011 thousands of people responded to a call to arms. It was a call for direct action right in the centre of London Stock Exchange to expose the reality of finance, to shed light on the activities of traders and the affect it has on all of us.  Occupy resonated with many people.

There is a real optimism around the place that change can happen when people are consulted and included.  The Occupy London encourages active discussion and participation, through directive decision making and experimenting with new forms of social relations and democracy.  Disagreements take place but listening and being sensitive to others is expected.

This movement deserves our recognition and support. The changing weather is more of a problem than the Corporation of London’s threats and needs your support.


The following is a list of items that have been requested:

1)Blankets  (most urgent request)

2)Pillows

3)Fit heaters

4)Books

5)Chairs

6)Coloured pens and markers

Do get involved and help this powerful movement with legitimate concerns grow. Take your items there or alternatively send them to Red Pepper office and we can take them there:

44-48 Shepherdess Walk,London, N1 7JP


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