Can there be a new left party? Ken Loach – and 2,000 people – hope so

Film director Ken Loach has called for the creation of a new party of the left in Britain. Kate Hudson explains why she is supporting the call

March 19, 2013 · 2 min read

kenAusterity is wreaking economic catastrophe on the people of Cyprus, but George Osborne is still following the same disastrous policies. This week’s budget comes as no surprise – yet another £2.5 billion in cuts. He’s digging us even further into an economic hole, and ordinary people are paying the price. The virulence of the government’s economic attacks knows no bounds: Atos, workfare, the bedroom tax – punitive policies against the most vulnerable in society.

Where can we turn politically? Who is on our side, to fight for an alternative? In the past we expected the Labour Party to stand for us, and with us, but no longer.

Workfare? Today Labour abstained on the vote and now the government can work over a quarter of a million jobseekers. Bedroom tax? Will a Labour government repeal it?

We need policies that reject Tory cuts, regenerate the economy and improve the lives of ordinary people. We are not getting this from Labour.

There is no doubt that Labour’s past achievements have been remarkable – the welfare state, the NHS; a redistributive economy making unprecedented levels of health and happiness possible. But such achievements are in the past. Now Labour embraces cuts and privatisation and is dismantling its own great work. Labour has failed us. Nothing shows the contrast more clearly than Ken Loach’s new film, The Spirit of ’45.

Now Ken is calling on people to join the discussion on forming a new party of the left. The working class cannot remain without political representation, without defence, when all its victories and advances are being destroyed. Over 2,000 people have signed up to Ken’s appeal within three days of its launch. Please support it urgently.

Ken Loach’s appeal is at leftunity.org/appeal



Dreams of a No-Deal Nation

Tom Kibasi argues that those who want to avoid crashing out of the EU need to offer hope, not just cautionary tales.

The migration system isn’t ready for Brexit – and EU citizens will suffer.

The future is uncertain for the three million EU nationals living in the UK, writes Jack Gevertz

What Europe wants

Niccolò Milanese explains where the European Commission and its nation-states stand on Brexit's big questions.


What does Brexit mean for migrants?

We could face a turbo-charged version of racist migration policy: free movement for the few and a hostile environment for the many. By Ana Oppenheim and Alena Ivanova.

Mayday for Britain

The prime minister is digging in despite her inability to govern, writes Nick Dearden. Where next for the left?

The right’s looming challenge to democracy in Greece

By Dionysia Pitsili-Chatzi, Aris Spourdalakis, Jodi Dean Leo Panitch, and Hilary Wainwright,