Ankara: call out for UK unions to show support for Kurdish and Turkish brothers and sisters

After the Ankara boming, UK trade union support is needed more than ever, writes Peace in Kurdistan Trade Union Liasion Officer Stephen Smellie

October 13, 2015 · 4 min read

Colleagues,

The trade union confederations in Turkey, KESK and DISK, along with the Engineers and Architects Association and the Medical Association, organised the demonstration and rally in Ankara on Saturday which was attacked by 2 bomb blasts, resulting  in the death of over 100 people with many hundreds more being injured. The demonstration was called under the slogan of ‘Labour for Peace.’

The progressive trade unions decided to call the demonstration in order to provide a focus point for all those in the country who are opposed to the policies of conflict promoted by the Turkish government of President Erdogan and the AKP (Peace and Development Party) and the increasing violence targeted mainly at the Kurdish community by state forces.

Whilst the Government talks of fighting terrorism it bombs PKK (Kurdistan Workers’ Party) bases in Iraq when the PKK had in place a ceasefire and were engaged in the struggle in Iraq and Syria against ISIS. At the same time hundreds of Kurdish activists, including elected representatives of the opposition party HDP, have been arrested in Turkey. However the state action has not been restricted to attacks on Kurdish organisations. Trade union and left activists have also been targeted.

Whilst on a visit to Turkey in late September I met with trade unionists in Diyarbakir in eastern Turkey and in Istanbul and they confirmed that their organisations had been targeted. Whilst I was in Diyarbakir, the offices of the health union, SES (affiliated to KESK), were attacked by police smashing in doors and intimidating those present whilst claiming to be searching for terrorists.

The demonstration on Saturday was therefore an attempt to unite across all sections of society for peace. Whilst the pro-Kurdish HDP party actively supported the demonstration, it was attended by many people who are trade union members and who support other parties such as the biggest opposition party in the Turkish parliament, the CHP.

The bomb blasts have been condemned by many people and organisations, including the International Trade Union Confederation, the European Trade Union Confederation, and Public Services International.

Many people in  Turkey believe that the state was behind the attacks. For those of us in the UK this is difficult to understand but in Turkey the ‘deep state’ operates at many levels with various semi-autonomous organisations operating as they see fit to protect the interests of the state. Whether this means planting bombs, prompting fascist groups to do so, or allowing ISIS contacts to operate in the country and cross over the Syrian border, is impossible to say. However, in the bomb blast in Diyarbakir on 5 June where 4 people died and 200 were injured there were no reports of any police officers being injured. In the reports from Saturday there has also been no mention of police officers being injured in the blasts. Considering their scale it is remarkable that no police were in the vicinity and suffered injuries. People in Turkey believe that this is proof that the police at least had knowledge of the bombs so that their personnel could be removed to a safe distance.

The Turkish government party, AKP, lost its overall majority in the general election in June and have refused to agree terms with any of the 3 opposition parties that would have allowed for a coalition government to be created. Instead they have called a further election on 1 November. Since June they have prosecuted a policy of conflict and violence, heightening tensions, as part of their attempt to win an overall majority. This cynical campaign needs to be exposed further and challenged by all progressive organisations and governments in Europe and beyond.

The trade unions in the UK must stand shoulder to shoulder with their Turkish and Kurdish brothers and sisters at this time. Messages of support and solidarity should be sent to international@disk.org.tr (please copy any messages to Stephen Smellie at stephenfs59_@hotmail.com).

Stephen Smellie
Trade Union Liaison Officer Peace In Kurdistan
Deputy Convenor UNISON Scotland

For more information visit Peace In Kurdistan.



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