Red Pepper website editor – general election website

Voluntary but rewarding position, closing date 16 April 2010

March 31, 2010 · 1 min read

Red Pepper is a voice of political rebellion and dissent. It is a magazine of information, campaigning and culture, providing the left with an open forum to debate ideas and action and share information.

We will shortly be launching a special website to cover the general election. This will build on the coverage of the election in our April/May issue, and especially our ‘grassroots guide’. This special website will also be a pilot for the relaunch of our main website shortly afterwards.

We are recruiting an editor for our special general election website, to start as soon as possible. We hope that this website editor would also be involved in the whole of Red Pepper’s online presence on an ongoing basis, joining the editorial collective and playing a role in the migration to the new Red Pepper website.

Please don’t hestiate to contact us if you want more information (contact details for this in the covering letter below).

 
 
 
 
 
 


Lockdown live: ‘The politics of truth’

Join Marcus Gilroy-Ware, Sarah Jaffe, Thomas Konda and Hilary Wainwright to tackle conspiracy theories, fake news, and the increasing precarity of 'truth'

Sudan: the second wave of revolt

The Sudanese revolution has been unique in its depth and scope. Yet the path to progress remains fraught with obstacles, writes Sara Abbas

Manchester skyline

Why planning is political

Andrea Sandor explores how community-led developments are putting democracy at the heart of the planning process


Review – Tracksuits, Traumas and Class Traitors

D Hunter's 'Tracksuits, Traumas and Class Traitors' is an exploration of working-class struggle and strength, writes Liam Kennedy

Bank Job directors Daniel and Hilary

Review – Bank Job

Jake Woodier reviews a new documentary film that brings heist aesthetics to a story of debt activism

Beyond leek-flavoured UKism

‘Radical federalism’ should do more than rearrange the constitutional furniture, writes Undod’s Robat Idris