Linton Kwesi Johnson headlines TUC concert

Philosophy Football brings together a spellbinding lineup for the TUC, mixing ideas and entertainment around Rhyme, Rhythm and Reason

September 21, 2009 · 1 min read

The legendary Linton Kwesi Johnson, making a rare London live appearance, will showcase his dissenting poetry with fellow dub poet, the incomparable Jean ‘Binta’ Breeze. Also featuring Laura Dockrill, one of the best of a new generation of young spoken word artists and The Zong Zing All Stars will open the night.

Combining the rhyme and the rhythm with some reason will be TUC Deputy General Secretary Frances O’ Grady and Paul Mason, author of Meltdown : The End of the Age of Greed. Detailing the changing contours of class will be Lynsey Hanley, journalist and author of the wonderful Estates : An Intimate History, while Doreen Massey, author of World City, maps the impact of gobalisation on traditional trade union demands.

Wednesday 7 October (advance booking is strongly advised)

TUC Congress Centre. 23-28 Great Russell Street, London WC1

Tickets just £9.99 (redeemable as a £5 discount off Philosophy Football t-shirts on the night). Book here.


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