5 June

'This is the twenty-seventh time I have been arrested and I ain't going to jail no more! The only way we gonna stop them white men from whuppin' us is to take over. What we gonna start sayin' now is Black Power!'

June 5, 2009 · 2 min read

On 5 June, 1966, Columbia law student James Meredith started his solitary March against Fear from Memphis to Jackson, to encourage African Americans to register and vote.

Soon after starting his march he was wounded by a sniper and civil rights leaders incuding Martin Luther King, Stokely Carmichael and Floyd McKissick continued the march his name. On reaching Greenwood, Mississippi, Stokely Carmichael gave his now famous Black Power speech:

‘And we’re never going to get caught up in questions about power. This country knows what power is. It knows it very well. And it knows what Black Power is ’cause it deprived black people of it for 400 years. So it knows what Black Power is. That the question of, Why do black people — Why do white people in this country associate Black Power with violence? And the question is because of their own inability to deal with “blackness.” If we had said “Negro power” nobody would get scared. Everybody would support it. Or if we said power for colored people, everybody’d be for that, but it is the word “black” – it is the word “black” that bothers people in this country, and that’s their problem, not mine – they’re problem, they’re problem.’

excerpt from Black Power by Stokely Carmichael


Playing on the dark side: An interview with Dawn Ray’d

Gerry Hart speaks to Simon Barr of Dawn Ray'd about black metal, its relationship with the far right and its radical potential

The global spectres of ‘Asian horror’

Bliss Cua Lim looks at how the female ghost subgenre illuminates efforts to globalise ‘Asian horror’

Rudolf Rocker: an anarchist ‘rabbi’ in London

David J. Lobina rediscovers a forgotten but fascinating figure in London’s radical and Jewish history


Review – Falling Down: The Conservative Party and the Decline of Tory Britain by Phil Burton-Cartledge

Sabrina Huck argues that a generational shift away from the Conservative Party can’t be taken for granted

The driver of dispossession

Tina Ngata explains the social and legal legacies of a 15th-century Christian principle that paved the way for imperial violence in, and far beyond, New Zealand

Review – Just Us: An American Conversation

Claudia Rankine's collection perfectly illustrates the power of frank conversations with white people on race and racism, writes Kimberly McIntosh

Want to try Red Pepper before you take out a subscription? Sign up to our newsletter and read Issue 231 for free.