28 July

'Songs like Revolution don't mean a pair of sneakers, they mean Revolution.' Paul McCartney

July 28, 2009 · 1 min read

According to an Associated Press article, on this day in 1987, the Beatles sued Nike for $15 million for using their song ‘Revolution’ in a TV commercial.

‘Yoko Ono, John Lennon’s widow, expressed approval when the commercial was released; she was quoted in Time magazine as saying the commercial ”is making John’s music accessible to a new generation”. The surviving ex-Beatles have not commented publicly. Leonard M Marks, Apple’s lawyer, said yesterday that Ms Ono and the three surviving Beatles each own 25 percent of Apple and that the company requires ”unanimity among the four Beatles’ interests in order to act”, implying that Ms. Ono had concurred in bringing the suit. ”They are all outraged about the commercial,” he said.’

Jon Pareles, New York Times, 5 August 1987



Workers unite online

They're logging on to combat lagging labour laws, costly court proceedings, and outsourcing management, writes Gaia Caramazza

Review – Finding a Voice: Asian women in Britain

Finding a Voice: Asian women in Britain, by Amrit Wilson, reviewed by Maya Goodfellow

The political whiteness of #MeToo

We need to confront how the movement is shaped by the power of whiteness, write Alison Phipps


Trumpism goes global

Trumpism is capitalism’s Plan B, writes Nick Dearden

Brexit’s drug problem

For all the talk of free-trade, why is ‘Global Britain’ still behind on drug law reform? By Kojo Koram

What happens if a university fails?

David Ridley reflects on the Augar Review