27 October

Dylan Thomas's birthday. Although he dismissed the literary Marxists of the 1930s as 'parlour pinks', he remained a committed socialist to his death.

October 27, 2009 · 1 min read

‘I take my stand with any revolutionary body that asserts it to be the right of all men to share, equally and impartially, every production of man… from the sources of production at man’s disposal.’ New Verse (1934)

Remember the procession of the old-young men

From dole queue to corner and back again,

From the pinched, packed streets to the peak of slag

In the bite of the winters with shovel and bag,

With a drooping fag and a turned up collar,

Stamping for the cold at the ill-lit corner

Dragging through the squalor with their hearts like lead

Staring at the hunger and the shut pit-head

Nothing in their pockets, nothing home to eat,

Lagging from the slagheap to the pinched, packed street.

Remember the procession of the old-young men.

It shall never happen again.


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