27 November

'It must not be just black people, it must be all poor people. We must include American Indians, Puerto Ricans, Mexicans, and even poor whites.' With these words, on 27 November 1967, Martin Luther King launched what he called the 'second phase' of the American civil rights movement.

November 27, 2009 · 1 min read

The Poor People’s Campaign was an attempt to build on the achievements of the ‘first phase’ of the civil rights struggle. This had culminated in legislation ending segregation and guaranteeing basic rights for people of all races in the US.

King aimed to overcome what he termed the ‘limitations to our achievements’ by using the same tactics of nonviolent direct action to focus attention on economic equality and poverty that had been so successful over civil rights. It was to prove a tougher objective, however, and with King’s assassination the Poor People’s Campaign never really got off the ground.


Morality tales

From cowardly men to wayward wives, pre-modern superstitions transmitted social norms as well as scares, writes Eleanor Janega

Playing on the dark side: An interview with Dawn Ray’d

Gerry Hart speaks to Simon Barr of Dawn Ray'd about black metal, its relationship with the far right and its radical potential

The global spectres of ‘Asian horror’

Bliss Cua Lim looks at how the female ghost subgenre illuminates efforts to globalise ‘Asian horror’


Rudolf Rocker: an anarchist ‘rabbi’ in London

David J. Lobina rediscovers a forgotten but fascinating figure in London’s radical and Jewish history

Review – Falling Down: The Conservative Party and the Decline of Tory Britain by Phil Burton-Cartledge

Sabrina Huck argues that a generational shift away from the Conservative Party can’t be taken for granted

The driver of dispossession

Tina Ngata explains the social and legal legacies of a 15th-century Christian principle that paved the way for imperial violence in, and far beyond, New Zealand

Want to try Red Pepper before you take out a subscription? Sign up to our newsletter and read Issue 231 for free.