26 July

'As in every revolution, the price was high. Half of the rebels died, not in combat, but under torture ... The irate tyranny could not conceive that the near-defeat it suffered had been inflicted by a group of ill-equipped youthful civilians with no ties whatsoever to disgruntled politicians, army chiefs, or an exotic ideology.' _ The Twelve, Carlos Franqui, Random House

July 26, 2009 · 1 min read

Today in 1953, Fidel Castro led an attack on the Moncada military barracks in Santiago de Cuba in an attempt to overthrow the Bastista goverment. The attack was unsuccessful, with most of the rebels killed or captured.

At his later trial, Fidel said: ‘I know that imprisonment will be harder for me than it has ever been for anyone, filled with cowardly threats and hideous cruelty. But I do not fear prison, as I do not fear the fury of the miserable tyrant who took the lives of 70 of my comrades. Condemn me. It does not matter. History will absolve me.’



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