26 July

'As in every revolution, the price was high. Half of the rebels died, not in combat, but under torture ... The irate tyranny could not conceive that the near-defeat it suffered had been inflicted by a group of ill-equipped youthful civilians with no ties whatsoever to disgruntled politicians, army chiefs, or an exotic ideology.' _ The Twelve, Carlos Franqui, Random House

July 26, 2009 · 1 min read

Today in 1953, Fidel Castro led an attack on the Moncada military barracks in Santiago de Cuba in an attempt to overthrow the Bastista goverment. The attack was unsuccessful, with most of the rebels killed or captured.

At his later trial, Fidel said: ‘I know that imprisonment will be harder for me than it has ever been for anyone, filled with cowardly threats and hideous cruelty. But I do not fear prison, as I do not fear the fury of the miserable tyrant who took the lives of 70 of my comrades. Condemn me. It does not matter. History will absolve me.’


Gender, class and cliché in the BBC’s Normal People

Normal People shows the complexities of class mobility, but can’t avoid class and gender stereotypes, says Frances Hatherley

Momentum

Forward Momentum: democracy isn’t a distraction

Democracy isn’t a distraction, says Deborah Hermanns - it’s the only way to transform Momentum and the Labour Party and effectively build power in our communities.

Transgender Pride Flag

This government is failing trans people: Labour must take a stronger stand

Aisling Gallagher explains why Liz Truss’ recent rhetoric on proposed reforms to the Gender Recognition Act signals a worrying shift.


The politics of Covid-19: a crisis for cleaners

Cleaners are being ignored in the government’s provision of a safety-net during the pandemic. The current crisis is rooted in a long history of domestic work being made invisible, writes Laura Schwartz

Kes - unshorn hair - is an article of faith for Sikhs (Credit: Shreyans Bhansali)

Sacrificing sovereignty: Sikhs and Covid-19

Against a backdrop of militaristic rhetoric, Shuranjeet Singh interrogates why some Sikhs are being forced to choose between their faith and their patients

The politics of Covid-19: the frictions and promises of mutual aid

Thousands of mutual aid groups have sprung up around the UK, grounded in different experiences and perspectives. Amardeep Singh Dhillon asks: Whose vision of community-serving work will win out?