21 June

'At least one half of the crowd was composed of the sort of people you would expect to see at a suburban garden party.' _ Yorkshire Daily Post

June 21, 2009 · 1 min read

Today in 1908, the first major country-wide demonstration in support women’s suffrage took place. In London’s Hyde Park, ‘Women’s Sunday’ was attended by an estimated 200000 to 300000 people.

Sunday was chosen so as many working class women as possible could attend, while their wealthier sisters emptied London’s department stores of the white (representing purity) dresses that they were encourage to wear; as well as green (hope) and purple (dignity) accessories. The idea to look as ‘fetching’, ‘charming’ and as ‘ladylike’ as possible but it still failed to impress Mr Asquith.


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