November 2006


Exit strategies

1 November 2006 Death can become you. Fiona Osler investigates the green and non-religious alternatives for seeing off this mortal coil

The £4 billion rip-off

1 November 2006 It's like putting Enron in charge of the power grid. That's how US businessman Phil Zweig describes the privatisation of NHS procurement.

The end of the internet?

1 November 2006 The way the internet works at the moment, you can access a blog by an anti-war teenager from Utah on an equal footing with the website of the US defence department. But all that could change if some of the big internet service providers get their way. Leigh Phillips warns of the threat to the internet as we know it

Classy class warrior

1 November 2006 Dear Auntie I've dedicated my last 15 years to 'the movement', even hitching to Genoa for the 2001 G8 protests and biking to Stirling for last year's counter-summit. But I share this passion for activism with a love of fine living. I wouldn't be seen dead without my Gucci sunglasses, my most treasured possession is my Aga stove, and I even rounded off the Genoa trip with a spot of wine tasting in Tuscany. Can I continue to be classy without being a class traitor?

Nukes for all

1 November 2006 Is the world on the brink of a new nuclear arms race, with North Korea's atomic bomb test marking the end of non-proliferation? John Gittings reports

Britain’s global power empire

1 November 2006 What is the British government doing promoting electricity privatisation in the developing world? John Hilary reports on the government-owned multinational power company Globeleq

Beyond the public sector

1 November 2006 Support for the 'third sector' of social enterprises, charities and the like has never been stronger. Martin McIvor considers how to prevent it turning into backdoor privatisation

Frank, as in honest

1 November 2006 The leaking of a secret speech by the Hungarian prime minister, Ferenc Gyurcsany, has led to mass protests and political crisis in Budapest. In the speech, Gyurcsany said that his party had lied to the electorate to win the April election. Laszlo Bihari reports on the political fallout from the truth about Hungary's honest liar

Veiled threats

1 November 2006 Multiculturalism has been getting the blame for the alleged lack of integration of minority groups into British society. It isn't beyond criticism, but neither is it the main cause of social division. That's down to racism and economic inequality, writes Mike Marqusee

Kyoto: a false consensus?

1 November 2006 At the UN climate talks in Nairobi, Kenya, from 6-17 November 2006, many participants are likely to concentrate on defending and extending the Kyoto Protocol against the Bush administration's opposition. However, a new book critiques the embattled Kyoto agreement and other carbon trading schemes from a different social justice.

In search of the good life

1 November 2006 During the past year the pressure group Compass has undertaken a thoroughgoing attempt to rethink a democratic left politics of freedom, equality and solidarity. The first of three publications, The Good Society, was published in September 2006. Jonathan Rutherford, the chair of Compass's Good Society Working Group, argues that at its heart must be a new set of values and a new idea of the individual

Making the case against consumerism

1 November 2006 In order to argue effectively against New Labour's consumerist approach to public services, campaigners must avoid several political cul de sacs. Catherine Needham shows the way

A new Siamese tragedy

1 November 2006 Thailand's recent military coup - the 18th since 1932 - ousted a leader, Thaksin Shinawatra, who had already lost moral legitimacy and much of his political power. In pre-empting the democracy of the street, argues Walden Bello, the country's military has administered a cure that will prove worse than the disease

OurSpace: the new frontier

1 November 2006 The left needs to do much more than simply oppose the marketisation of public services - it must promote a positive alternative. In a series of articles, Red Pepper authors consider how that might be done. Hilary Wainwright sets the scene