16 November

On 16 November 1989, six Jesuit priests were murdered, together with their housekeeper and her daughter, by a US-trained death squad in El Salvador.

November 16, 2009 · 1 min read

The United Nations Truth Commission on El Salvador linked the killings to 19 members of the El Salvador armed forces who were graduates of the School of the Americas (SOA), now renamed the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation.

SOA has trained more than 60,000 Latin American soldiers in counter-insurgency techniques, including interrogation methods and psychological warfare. Its graduates have been responsible for some of the most brutal activities and suppression of civil rights in South America over the past half-century.


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