16 November

On 16 November 1989, six Jesuit priests were murdered, together with their housekeeper and her daughter, by a US-trained death squad in El Salvador.

November 16, 2009 · 1 min read

The United Nations Truth Commission on El Salvador linked the killings to 19 members of the El Salvador armed forces who were graduates of the School of the Americas (SOA), now renamed the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation.

SOA has trained more than 60,000 Latin American soldiers in counter-insurgency techniques, including interrogation methods and psychological warfare. Its graduates have been responsible for some of the most brutal activities and suppression of civil rights in South America over the past half-century.


The Socialist Olympics of 1936

Radical workers’ sporting organisations and the 1936 People’s Olympiad illustrate the role of sport in fighting oppression, writes Uma Arruga i López.

Review – You’re History: The Twelve Strangest Women in Music

Lesley Chow argues for a new kind of music criticism that re-evaluates women musicians and "meaningless" music, writes Rhian E Jones

Lying through their legacy-speak

Olympic ‘legacy’ has greased the path for enormous, upward transfer of wealth to the global propertied classes, writes Jules Boykoff


SWexit: What are exit schemes for sex workers missing?

If earning money is a fundamental reason for entering the sex industry, it is also essential to leaving it, writes Marin Scarlett.

Failure to deliver

Major financial institutions have cited Deliveroo’s employment practices for its disastrous public share launch. Alice Martin and Tom Powdrill look at what went wrong and what it might mean for workers’ rights

Power on the picket line: remembering the Burnsall Strike

Almost 30 years on, Sarbjit Johal recalls supporting the strike, which consisted of mostly Punjabi women workers

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