14 June

'The spirit of mutiny swept the land. A tremendous, mysterious process was taking place in countless hearts: bonds of fear were being broken, the individual personality, having hardly had time to become conscious of itself, became dissolved in the mass, and the mass itself became dissolved in the revolutionary élan.' _ Leon Trotsky. Words used in the original version of Sergei Eisenstein's revolutionary film Battleship Potemkin

June 14, 2009 · 1 min read

On 14 June 1905, 30 sailors on the Battleship Potemkin refused to eat meat riddled with maggots. The ship’s officers ordered the sailors to be shot. This sparked a revolt of the ship’s crew, who killed most of the officers and later forced the ship to dock at Odessa where a general strike was already in progress. But the leaders of the Odessa strike were unable to convince the crew to help the workers and act together. The rebellion ultimately failed but helped sow the seeds for the Russian Revolution of 1917.

As Lenin said of the uprising: ‘The Rubicon has been crossed.’


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