13 November

On 13 November 1887, soon to be dubbed 'Bloody Sunday', two men are killed as police attack an unemployment demonstration in London.

November 13, 2009 · 1 min read

Responding to a resurgence in socialist and other radical activity in London, and clashes at a massive demonstration earlier that year, the new Metropolitan Police commissioner, the former colonial governor Sir Charles Warren, had banned all meetings in Trafalgar Square. He determined to enforce the ban with the utmost ferocity.

One of the many demonstrators arrested was the Radical MP for Lanark, Cunningharn Grahame. A neutral bystander described what happened: ‘After Mr Grahame’s arrest was complete one policeman after another, two certainly, but I think no more, stepped up from behind and struck him on the head from behind with a violence and brutality which were shocking to behold. Even after this, and when some some five or six other police were dragging him into the square, another from behind seized him most needlessly by the hair … and dragged his head back, and in that condition he was forced many yards.’


The Socialist Olympics of 1936

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Lying through their legacy-speak

Olympic ‘legacy’ has greased the path for enormous, upward transfer of wealth to the global propertied classes, writes Jules Boykoff


SWexit: What are exit schemes for sex workers missing?

If earning money is a fundamental reason for entering the sex industry, it is also essential to leaving it, writes Marin Scarlett.

Failure to deliver

Major financial institutions have cited Deliveroo’s employment practices for its disastrous public share launch. Alice Martin and Tom Powdrill look at what went wrong and what it might mean for workers’ rights

Power on the picket line: remembering the Burnsall Strike

Almost 30 years on, Sarbjit Johal recalls supporting the strike, which consisted of mostly Punjabi women workers

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