13 June

'But out of the gobbledygook comes a very clear thing: you can't trust the government; you can't believe what they say; and you can't rely on their judgment; and the implicit infallibility of presidents, which has been an accepted thing in America, is badly hurt by this, because it shows that people do things the president wants to do even though it's wrong, and the president can be wrong.' _ H R Haldeman to President Nixon, 14 June 1971

June 13, 2009 · 1 min read

The New York Times began publishing the Pentagon Papers on this day in 1971. This was a series of excerpts from the Defense Department’s classified history, documenting US involvement in Vietnam from the end of World War Two to 1968.

The administration won a court order preventing further publication after three articles had appeared but on 30 June the United States Supreme Court ruled that publication could resume.


Greenwash

Alethea Warrington describes how the fossil fuels industry hopes to change its image but not its practice

Frontline workers and Covid-19: a carer’s account

Ndella Diouf Paye writes about her experiences working as a carer for a private company

The state of things to come

Politicians, the state, and the market have failed to come to terms with Covid-19. Can 'people power' navigate a way out of the crisis? K Biswas introduces the TNI Covid Capitalism Report


Pints, patriotism and precarity

Oli Carter-Esdale explores the weaponisation of the pint and asks: where next for the hospitality sector?

UK, hun?

Materially, the UK is not a nation – with fewer common experiences than ever before, from schools and policing to borders and governance – argue Medb MacDaibheid and Brian Christopher

What key work really means

While economic activity slowed down during the Covid-19 crisis, accumulation of wealth continues for capitalists at the cost of key workers’ health and wellbeing, writes Notes From Below

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