13 June

'But out of the gobbledygook comes a very clear thing: you can't trust the government; you can't believe what they say; and you can't rely on their judgment; and the implicit infallibility of presidents, which has been an accepted thing in America, is badly hurt by this, because it shows that people do things the president wants to do even though it's wrong, and the president can be wrong.' _ H R Haldeman to President Nixon, 14 June 1971

June 13, 2009 · 1 min read

The New York Times began publishing the Pentagon Papers on this day in 1971. This was a series of excerpts from the Defense Department’s classified history, documenting US involvement in Vietnam from the end of World War Two to 1968.

The administration won a court order preventing further publication after three articles had appeared but on 30 June the United States Supreme Court ruled that publication could resume.



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