1 September

'This is crack cocaine seized a few days ago by Drug Enforcement agents in a park just across the street from the White House.

September 1, 2009 · 1 min read

‘It could easily have been heroin or PCP. It’s as innocent-looking as candy, but it’s turning our cities into battle zones, and it’s murdering our children. Let there be no mistake: This stuff is poison. Some used to call drugs harmless recreation; they’re not. Drugs are a real and terribly dangerous threat to our neighborhoods, our friends, and our families.’

George HW Bush

Obtaining crack is no easy task, reported Michael Isikoff of the Washington Post, two weeks after George HW Bush made his first television address highlighting the evils of drugs.

The crack had not been seized just across the street from the White House but came from a planned sting operation by the Drug Enforcement Administration. On the third attempt!

On the first attempt, the dealer was a no show, on the second the undercover agents microphone packed up and on the third, attempt the camera operator missed the actual drug deal by seconds when he was assaulted by a homeless person.


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