Meet Red Pepper’s new co-editor, Michelle Zellers

Michelle Zellers introduces herself, her reasons for wanting to be part of Red Pepper and her hopes for its future

April 21, 2013
4 min read


Michelle Zellers is a member of Red Pepper's editorial collective. Based in Newcastle, she also works for a student union.

I am thrilled to join the Red Pepper editorial collective. A new resident of Durham, I am originally from the Detroit area and have also lived on the US West Coast. There, I became passionately involved in my postgraduate labour union, which added not only to my paltry teaching wages, but also to the conversation about the need for democracy in higher education. In the past, I’ve contributed to student anti-sweatshop activism, Occupy and the founding of an IWW branch, which has helped to unite a broad spectrum of workers in my former community, Corvallis, Oregon. I hold a MFA in creative writing, and in addition to rabble-rousing, I write fiction that depicts women characters pushing against the bounds of gender roles.

Part of my excitement about joining Red Pepper comes from my view that this is a critical time for people on the left to get to know each other. I grew up with the narrative that ‘civilisation’ marches steadily toward progress, discovering more humane solutions to the world’s troubles thanks to new technologies and the benevolence of our leaders. In my youth, I became terrified that this was a lie. Gradually, I understood that as banks, corporations and drones cross borders, power consolidates its assets; elites worldwide are exchanging ‘best practice’ in organised oppression. Bitter-sweetly, disparate people find ourselves, more than ever, stuck together—fighting similar degrading laws and official lies—even if the differences remain vast among us. Austerity, poverty, rape, state surveillance and so much else are global phenomena.

And yet, I’m encouraged, because the truth never works in the favour of those who would abuse and control us. Such people need to purchase every newspaper and airwave; it takes constant effort to justify an unjust status quo and to deaden people’s spirits. By contrast, there is permanence to radical consciousness. It outlives the news cycle, because what we see, we cannot unsee. In 1971, discussing how patriarchy had influenced Western literature, poet Adrienne Rich said, ‘We need to know the writing of the past, and know it differently than we have ever known it; not to pass on a tradition but to break its hold over us.’ She was advocating for ‘re-vision’: changing the dominant narratives and re-casting ourselves in meaningful roles that have yet to be fully imagined. Only then, I think, can we head toward a better future than the one capitalism has charted for us.

What are the counter-narratives we can use? What are the alternatives to stories of an undeserving poor or the supposed necessity of nuclear arms? As we work, organise our communities and care for each other, how do we understand what we do every day and where we’re headed? The thread, I think, can only be discovered when we habitually speak across borders, not just the borders of political states but of age, life experience, separate households and separate uniforms.

For me, Red Pepper has provided such a space for cross-border learning. I’ve read it from one corner of the world and seen how the dot of my own work connects to other dots on the map. That knowledge makes me a better organiser: more equipped to explain to my neighbours how our groundwork is part of a living, breathing thing. Our progress, our solidarity, will never be reflected back to us by the corporate media, perhaps in part because that would fuel our motivation to keep going. But the void they leave, through their exclusion of the stories of poor and working people, cannot be left as a void. We need to see our own stories and talk about them in order to shape a future.

I hope to continue Red Pepper’s history of asking honest questions and bringing the left together to debate the way forward. I hope, also, to connect with readers in the north of England and learn about the challenges, interests and desires of my new neighbours in the UK. Thanks for reading.

– Michelle Zellers


Michelle Zellers is a member of Red Pepper's editorial collective. Based in Newcastle, she also works for a student union.


✹ Try our new pay-as-you-feel subscription — you choose how much to pay.

The Migrant Connections Festival: solidarity needs meaningful relationships
On March 4 & 5 Bethnal Green will host a migrant-led festival fostering community and solidarity for people of all backgrounds, writes Sohail Jannesari

Reclaiming Holloway Homes
The government is closing old, inner-city jails. Rebecca Roberts looks at what happens next

Intensification of state violence in the Kurdish provinces of Turkey
Oppression increases in the run up to Turkey’s constitutional referendum, writes Mehmet Ugur from Academics for Peace

Pass the domestic violence bill
Emma Snaith reports on the significance of the new anti-domestic violence bill

Report from the second Citizen’s Assembly of Podemos
Sol Trumbo Vila says the mandate from the Podemos Assembly is to go forwards in unity and with humility

Protect our public lands
Last summer Indigenous people travelled thousands of miles around the USA to tell their stories and build a movement. Julie Maldonado reports

From the frontlines
Red Pepper’s new race editor, Ashish Ghadiali, introduces a new space for black and minority progressive voices

How can we make the left sexy?
Jenny Nelson reports on a session at The World Transformed

In pictures: designing for change
Sana Iqbal, the designer behind the identity of The World Transformed festival and the accompanying cover of Red Pepper, talks about the importance of good design

Angry about the #MuslimBan? Here are 5 things to do
As well as protesting against Trump we have a lot of work to get on with here in the UK. Here's a list started by Platform

Who owns our land?
Guy Shrubsole gives some tips for finding out

Don’t delay – ditch coal
Take action this month with the Coal Action Network. By Anne Harris

Utopia: Work less play more
A shorter working week would benefit everyone, writes Madeleine Ellis-Petersen

Mum’s Colombian mine protest comes to London
Anne Harris reports on one woman’s fight against a multinational coal giant

Bike courier Maggie Dewhurst takes on the gig economy… and wins
We spoke to Mags about why she’s ‘biting the hand that feeds her’

Utopia: Daring to dream
Imagining a better world is the first step towards creating one. Ruth Potts introduces our special utopian issue

A better Brexit
The left should not tail-end the establishment Bremoaners, argues Michael Calderbank

News from movements around the world
Compiled by James O’Nions

Podemos: In the Name of the People
'The emergence as a potential party of government is testament both to the richness of Spanish radical culture and the inventiveness of activists such as Errejón' - Jacob Mukherjee reviews Errejón and Mouffe's latest release

Survival Shake! – creative ways to resist the system
Social justice campaigner Sakina Sheikh describes a project to embolden young people through the arts

‘We don’t want to be an afterthought’: inside Momentum Kids
If Momentum is going to meet the challenge of being fully inclusive, a space must be provided for parents, mothers, carers, grandparents and children, write Jessie Hoskin and Natasha Josette

The Kurdish revolution – a report from Rojava
Peter Loo is supporting revolutionary social change in Northern Syria.

How to make your own media
Lorna Stephenson and Adam Cantwell-Corn on running a local media co-op

Book Review: The EU: an Obituary
Tim Holmes takes a look at John Gillingham's polemical history of the EU

Book Review: The End of Jewish Modernity
Author Daniel Lazar reviews Enzo Traverso's The End of Jewish Modernity

Lesbians and Gays Support the Migrants
Ida-Sofie Picard introduces Lesbians and Gays Support the Migrants – as told to Jenny Nelson

Book review: Angry White People: Coming Face to Face With the British Far-Right
Hilary Aked gets close up with the British far right in Hsiao-Hung Pai's latest release

University should not be a debt factory
Sheldon Ridley spoke to students taking part in their first national demonstration.

Book Review: The Day the Music Died – a Memoir
Sheila Rowbotham reviews the memoirs of BBC director and producer, Tony Garnett.

Power Games: A Political History
Malcolm Maclean reviews Jules Boykoff's Power Games: A Political History


107