Socialism by stealth?
Dave Osler argues the Green Party can never become a popular front for the achievement of socialism

Green is the new red
Peter Tatchell argues the Greens are now the only credible radical left-wing alternative and the best hope for advancing a progressive political agenda

Whatever does it take?
The sooner the left gives up on Labour, the sooner it can begin to organise for real change, says John Nicholson

A new politics of pluralism
Mark Perryman asks why an effective left-of-Labour opposition has taken so long emerge - and what the prospects for it are now

The good, the bad and the future
Lord Chris Smith of Finsbury sees a chance to shape a new radical agenda for Labour under Gordon Brown

Still life
A latent radicalism still exists in the Labour Party, says defeated Labour deputy leadership contender Jon Cruddas. Now the left must tap it

Inside and outside left
The left must build new coalitions of ideas and organisation, inside and outside Labour, that compel leaders to be as radical as possible and encourage the more radical to rise to the top, writes Neal Lawson

Why stay?
Liz Davies was an active member of the Labour left between 1979 and 2001 and elected as a Grassroots Alliance candidate to the Labour Party's national executive committee between 1998 and 2000. Here she responds to Alex Nunn's essay and opens a debate that continues on the Red Pepper website and forum

What became of the Labour left?
After more than a decade of a concerted attempt to silence the left in the Labour Party, Alex Nunns inquires into whether there is still life in this vital challenge to the power of the executive

A healthy choice
Labour's deputy leadership contest has at least revealed one thing - the extent of unease over Tony Blair's market reforms of the NHS. Ministers have made statements that would once have got them sacked but now get them votes. Red Pepper and Keep Our NHS Public teamed up to survey the six candidates' views and see who's best for the NHS. By Alex Nunns

Alan Johnson
Red Pepper / Keep Our NHS Public survey of Labour deputy leadership candidates views on the NHS

Harriet Harman
Red Pepper / Keep Our NHS Public survey of Labour deputy leadership candidates views on the NHS

Peter Hain
Red Pepper / Keep Our NHS Public survey of Labour deputy leadership candidates views on the NHS

Hilary Benn
Red Pepper / Keep Our NHS Public survey of Labour deputy leadership candidates views on the NHS

Hazel Blears
Red Pepper / Keep Our NHS Public survey of Labour deputy leadership candidates views on the NHS

Jon Cruddas
Red Pepper / Keep Our NHS Public survey of Labour deputy leadership candidates views on the NHS

It’s Iraq, stupid
So Blair is going - at long last. Let's be clear about this departure. It is not, as he would have us believe, a voluntary act of renunciation, He, like Thatcher, would have gone 'on and on' if he had had his way.

The Blairafter
There was a time when democratic debate in the Labour Party was held up as compensation for the lack of constitutional control over a powerful executive.

A defining value
Tony Blair spoke the language of social exclusion and opportunity rather than of poverty and equality on taking office. He and other ministers made clear that redistribution through the tax-benefits system was no longer on Labour's agenda. So there were no illusions to be dashed with regard to tackling poverty and inequality.

What about the workers?
Discussion of class has gone out of fashion in today's Labour Party. All too often Labour leaders have colluded in a general stigmatisation of the poor and unemployed, who are in fact the victims of failures in the education and training systems and of bad employers.

A different kind of leader
Left-wing MP John McDonnell says that he wants to 'reclaim the Labour Party' and is standing as leader under the campaign slogan 'Another world is possible'. Why does he think it's worth the effort and what's the 'new politics' he's talking about? Interview by Hilary Wainwright

Is there hope at last?
A new internet campaign has begun to remove Tony Blair ([www.iwontvoteblair.com->http://www.iwontvoteblair.com/]) as an alternative to impeachment. The basic philosophy is that you can't personally vote Tony Blair out unless you live in Sedgefield, but his MPs can make him resign. The only reason they'll get rid of him is if he'll lose the election. They will lose their seats if you don't vote for them - that's motivation! All you are asked to do is write to your MP and clearly state, 'I promise I won't vote for a party with Tony Blair leading it' and tell all your friends to do the same. Should I put my name to this, or just hope that Tony Blair and his capitalist clique are just a bad dream? Yours Which Blair Project?

Labour’s hollow drum
Hilary Wainwright introduces Red Pepper's special on the Labour Party

No political statements allowed on the conference floor
Red Pepper's press officer and on-the-spot oik Alex Nunns attended the Labour Party Conference in Brighton, rubbed shoulders with the Lennon and McCartney of global development, wrestled a party apparatchik for a stapler, yawned his way through ministerial speeches -and kept a diary

Union wild card seeks to trump modernisers from within
GMB leader Kevin Curran tells Hilary Wainwright why his trade union will no longer write Labour a blank cheque

Ghosts in the machine
The decimation of its activist base hurts Labour's left as much as it does its leadership. To have any political influence at all the Labour left must reach out beyond the party.

Conservatives block reform of the Labour Party
Trade unionists and socialists set up the original Labour Representation Committee (LRC) on 27 February 1900. From that event the Labour Party was born. The launch of a new LRC at the TUC's central London headquarters Congress House on 3 July 2004 was billed as "the most significant initiative on the Labour left for a generation". But is it a case of "the Labour left", or "what is left of Labour"?

The RMT shows the way
To most Westminster pundits, the Rail, Maritime and Transport (RMT) union's opening of its political fund to organisations other than Labour and the union's consequent expulsion by the party are a sideshow.

Lord Hutton and all that
Anyone who comments on the proceedings of the Hutton Inquiry, and the mountain of documentation it has produced, is in danger of succumbing to the same loss of a sense of proportion that the inquiry itself represents. So, to keep things in perspective I think it would be useful to recall some basic facts.

Sacking the Ministry of Truth
"People here are concerned with the real issues," said the minister glowering at us, as if to say "not the issues you want to ask me about".