Open to abuse
Referendums should be limited to constitutional issues, argues Stuart Weir. We need to strengthen parliament, not weaken it further with popular-sounding initiatives such as these

Best left unsaid
David Beetham, Stuart Weir and Stuart Wilks-Heeg write down our unwritten and undemocratic constitution

Essay: Seizing the moment
It would be wise not to assume that there is a genuine 'golden opportunity' for any kind of major breakthrough on constitutional reform, writes Stuart Weir. But the door is half open to serious reform of parliament and we should not allow the chance to escape

A new zeitgeist on rights
The Convention on Modern Liberty inspired a huge surge of energy around civil liberties, says Stuart Weir. Human rights campaigners could be on the verge of a historic breakthrough

Modern liberty
The Human Rights Act might not command much popular support, but the rights and freedoms that it protects do. Stuart Weir reports on a national convention to strengthen the campaigns for civil and political rights

Our job as citizens
Strengthening human rights laws, protecting civil liberties and combating the database state are all interlinked, says Stuart Weir

Hammering the BNP
We must take on the far right by the force of our arguments, says Stuart Weir

Democracy now: Our perogative
The public and parliament must assert democratic control to ensure that Britain plays an ethical role in foreign affairs, writes Stuart Weir

Democracy’s last resort
The acquittal of two men who broke into the Fairford airbase to try to disable B52 bombers at the start of the Iraq war is a victory for democracy, writes Stuart Weir

Taming the prerogative
It was the royal prerogative that gave Blair the power to send British troops to Iraq without consulting Parliament. Surely, Stuart Weir argues, its reform is long overdue

Let the people decide
The farcical Hutton report will not restore public faith in the democratic process. One thing that might is introducing the jury system for future government inquiries.