Voices of descent
Addressing climate change can seem a colossal task. Melanie Jarman reports on the emerging 'transition town' movement, which is encouraging citizens' participation in long-term planning to change energy use at a local level

No carbon copy of the west?
With China’s energy consumption increasing by 65 per cent over the past three years alone, its rapid industrialisation has already made it the world’s second largest emitter of the greenhouse gases that accelerate climate change. Mel Jarman looks at how it is approaching the issue

(Micro)power for the people
It's been described as the environmental equivalent of "the leap from the steam engine to the diesel locomotive". Melanie Jarman considers whether a shift to micropower generation is the solution to climate change

Don’t hold your breath
As protesters prepare to give the G8 a warm Scottish welcome, Melanie Jarman predicts little chance of any agreement on climate change, save perhaps recognition, finally, that it is actually taking place

Why planting trees for carbon guilt doesn’t add up
Dirty, dangerous and financially unviable, nuclear power could never help in the battle to forestall climate change

Half-baked and irrelevant
The EU's much heralded Emissions Trading Scheme will do nothing to tackle the problem of climate change.

Taking the pledge
The campaign to prevent airport expansion is gathering early momentum

Energy independence and the American dream
Both Kerry and Bush recognise the need for alternatives to fossil fuels. Yet neither show any desire to address the US's bulimic consumption patterns.

The people vs the corporate polluters
Campaigners in the US are pioneering the use of civil lawsuits to force business to act on climate change, writes Melanie Jarman

Off-message at the World Bank
A World Bank internal report has urged that the institution should cease investing in fossil-fuel projects. Sadly, the bank is unlikely to act accordingly.

Cruising for a bruising
The prime minister seems to have woken up to the reality of climate change. So why is his government so recklessly keen on encouraging the aviation industry?

The end of the oil age
Fossil fuel companies are about to become industrial dinosaurs. Efforts to postpone their extinction would only accelerate the overheating of the planet.

Interview with Mark Lynas, author of High Tide
Mark Lynas spent three years travelling round the globe in search of one of the greatest untold tales of our time. Convinced that climate change was no longer a concern just for the future, Lynas set off to find that global warming is already having a tangible effect on people's lives. His wry observations and suggestions for change are brought together in High Tide: News from a Warming World, published this March. Melanie Jarman found out what he had to say for himself.

Why Planting Trees for Carbon Guilt Doesn’t Add Up
What do the production and distribution of Dido's Life for Rent album; Formula 1 racing; and more environmentally conscious air passengers have in common? All have had trees planted or preserved to compensate for, or "offset", their carbon-emitting behaviour. Unfortunately, however attractive such an equation between problem (climate change-accelerating carbon dioxide emissions) and solution (plant trees) might be, it doesn't actually work.

What planet are we on?
Imagine a planet which once held great oceans. Which had the warmth and water needed to support life. Now a freezing wind howls across rock strewn deserts whipping its red earth around high peaks and deep into valleys. With January's latest expeditions to Mars this, the Red Planet, is once again under scrutiny. For the first time, the robotic envoys of the human race will be searching for a history of water, a prerequisite for life on Mars. And although the planet's atmosphere is currently too heavy with carbon dioxide to sustain human life and the plants that would meet many needs, the question again rears its head - what would it take for human beings to live on Mars?